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Entries in Mammals - leopards (12)

Tuesday
Mar 16 2010

Porous China-Myanmar border allowing illegal wildlife trade

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TRAFFIC's annual snapshot into the state of the wildlife trade in China in 2008 was launched today at the CITES meeting in Qatar Click photo to enlarge Doha, Qatar, 16 March 2010— Porous borders are allowing vendors in Myanmar to offer a door-to-door delivery service for illegal wildlife products such as tiger bone wine to buyers in China, according to TRAFFIC’s latest snapshot into wildlife trade in China.

The State of Wildlife Trade in China 2008 , released today, is the third in an annual series on emerging trends in China’s wildlife trade.

The report found that over-exploitation of wildlife for trade has affected many species and is stimulating illegal trade across China’s borders.

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Apr 07 2009

Amur Leopard skin seized by Russian Police

The Amur Leopard skin seized by Russian police in Primorsky province; no more than 20 adult Amur Leopards are believed to exist, and this individual had apprently been shot. Click photo to enlarge © S. Aramilev / WWF Russia Moscow, Russia, 7 April 2009—Police officers inspecting a car in Primorsky province in the Russian Far East have discovered the skin of an Amur Leopard, one of the world’s rarest animals.

Only an estimated 14 to 20 adult Amur Leopards and 5 or 6 cubs survive in an area of just 2,500 km² in Russia’s south-western Primorye region according to the IUCN Redlist . The subspecies is extinct in China and the Korean Peninsula.

The skin’s identity was confirmed by experts from the Institute of Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Medicine of the Primorsky State Agricultural Academy, experts from Primorsky province Hunting Department and WWF Russia.

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Wednesday
Oct 15 2008

Tiger and other cat parts on open sale in Myanmar

TRAFFIC surveys found parts of Tigers and other wild cat species openly on sale in Myanmar, with some dealers claiming their Tiger parts originated in India Click photo to enlarge © Chris Shepherd / TRAFFIC Southeast Asia Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 15 October 2008—Skin and bones, canines and claws from almost 1,200 wild cats were observed in Myanmar’s wildlife markets during 12 surveys undertaken by TRAFFIC, the wildlife trade monitoring network. They included parts of at least 107 Tigers and all eight cat species native to Myanmar.

Irregular surveys over the last 15 years have recorded a total of 1,320 wild cat parts, representing a minimum of 1,158 individual animals.

“Although almost 1,200 cats were recorded, this can only be the tip of the iceberg,” said Chris Shepherd, Programme Co-ordinator for TRAFFIC’s Southeast Asia office.

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Wednesday
Jan 30 2008

Cross-border intelligence-sharing leads to major seizure in Thailand

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Leopard, Clouded Leopard and Tiger skins on sale near the Thai border © Gerald S. Cubitt/WWF-Canon Click photo to enlarge

Bangkok, Thailand, 30 January 2008- The ASEAN Wildlife Enforcement Network (ASEAN-WEN) is to support and help widen an investigation into an organized wildlife crime syndicate after yesterday's seizure of 11 dead Tigers, Leopards and Clouded Leopards, as well as 275 live pangolins from Khub Pung village of Tambon Nam Kham in Thailand, near the border with Lao PDR. 

The big cats, all wild-caught, are believed to have originated from southern Thailand or Malaysia, although this is still under investigation. The Royal Thai Navy's Khong River Coast Guard seized the pangolins from one truck and the six dead Tigers, three Leopards and two Clouded Leopards from another truck at 3 a.m. yesterday.

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